Pop Culture, YA Movie & TV News
Rating

Love, Simon: Why Fox Renaming ‘Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda’ is a Big Deal

A holy freaking huge awesome deal

by Shelumiel Delos Santos

A couple of weeks ago, Morris Award-winning author Becky Albertalli took to Twitter to announce/confirm that 20th Century Fox—the studio that is bringing Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda to the big screen—has decided to shorten the movie’s title to simply Love, Simon.

Today, I’m talking about what this means and why it’s important. Very important.

But before we get down to the order of business, let’s get something out of the way first, shall we? If you think Love, Simon rings familiar, you’re not making stuff up. I’m almost positive I know what your brain is remembering. It’s Love, Rosie, that 2014 film with Lily Collins and Sam Claflin, which is based on Cecelia Ahern’s sophomore novel. Or maybe your brain went straight to the book itself. It doesn’t matter. Not really. The point is Love, Rosie is out there. And I wish Love, Simon didn’t strongly resemble it but it does, and I’m okay with that. So there’s the caveat. Anyway…

I’m 24 and openly gay. I didn’t use to be. It took me roughly 18 years to come to terms with my sexuality, another year to tell people outside my immediate family and close friends. And Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda had a huge part on that journey, even if I didn’t realize it at the time. Because in retrospect, it made me feel seen. In all the ways that it is exhilarating and scary and nauseating and wonderful to be seen. In all the ways that I was afraid—but secretly craving—to be seen. And with Fox’s decision to rename the movie—and this is all on the studio and producers—I’m feeling these things all over again.

Because with Love, Simon, Fox is telling you right off the bat that this is a love story. With Love, Simon, Fox is telling you that a massive company like them is willing to bet—is betting—on this to be a blockbuster hit (or at the very least, that it would sell and go mainstream), despite its themes, despite it having two teenage gay boys at the center. Which is in turn telling you, if you’re queer, that you get to have the narrative. That you crushing on another boy is valid. That you’re entitled to your emotions. All of it. And more than anything, with Love, Simon, Fox is telling you that you matter and you get to see yourself and your high school romance in the big screens. That people will call it just as it is.

And I can’t stop smiling. Becky’s debut impacted me in a lot of sense that I’ll never be able to articulate. Now, I’m incredibly excited for this generation of young gay boys, who may not think much about books but are into films, to see Love, Simon and walk out of the cinemas having the courage to find a shore worth swimming to. Or, you know, be comfortable in their own skin. Yes, I’ll take that. I’ll take that any day of the week.

Love, Simon is set to hit theaters on March 16, 2018. So you have all the time in the world to catch up. Go pick up a copy today and thank me later. I mean. I’m just saying.



About Shelumiel Delos Santos

Shelumiel would like to think he’s funnier than he actually is, but the truth is he doesn’t freaking know. You can find him usually talking about race and gender representation in young adult literature over at Bookish and Awesome or otherwise fanboying on Twitter @mielsnickety.

Up next: Everything You Need to Know About “Love, Simon”