Update your password



Tour Info

Tour Info

Reader Rating:

The Boyfriend App

On-Sale Date: April 29 2014
Format: Paperback, 336pp
ISBN# 9780062195272
Change Format:
Price: $9.99

ABOUT

For fans of smart romantic comedies, this is a clever Cinderella story with a tech twist.

When Public Corporation, a giant tech company, announces a contest for the best app developed by a high school student—with $200,000 in prize money—computer whiz Audrey McCarthy is all in. Audrey's been searching for her one ticket out of town ever since her dad died and her best friend, perfect and popular Blake Dawkins, turned into her worst nightmare—and this scholarship may be it.

Audrey comes up with an idea so simple, yet so brilliant, she can't believe it hasn't been done before: the Boyfriend App. With a simple touch of the screen, romance blooms among the unlikeliest couples at school—and people start to take notice. But it's not quite enough.

To beat out the competition, Audrey will have to dig deeper—right into a scandal that would rock Public to its core. Launched into unexpected fame and passionately kissed by the hottest guys in school, Audrey finds that her invention has thrown her life into complete chaos . . . but can it bring her true love?

Book Description

An irresistible Cinderella story with a tech twist

Computer whiz Audrey McCarthy feels most at home in a tech lab, surrounded by her fellow geeks. Once popular and fearless, she hasn't been the same since her dad died. And her ex–best friend, gorgeous queen bee Blake Dawkins, has turned into her worst nightmare. Audrey is counting the minutes until high school is over and she can get the hell out of Dodge and go to college—that is, if she can find a scholarship.

So when Public Corporation, a giant tech company, announces a contest for the best app developed by a high schooler—with $200,000 in prize money—Audrey is spurred into action. She comes up with an idea so simple, yet so brilliant, she can't believe it hasn't been done: the Boyfriend App.

With a simple touch of the screen, romance blooms among the unlikeliest couples at school, and people start to take notice. But it's not quite enough.

To beat out the competition, Audrey will have to dig deeper. And she does—right into a scandal that would rock Public to its core. Suddenly the Boyfriend App lands Audrey where she never expected to be: in the limelight, passionately kissed by the hottest guys in school, causing complete and utter mayhem. But can it bring her true love?

This book sounds so interesting. I can't wait to read it especially since it is a YA book with a Cinderella touch to it. :)

reply

This book sounds so interesting. I can't wait to read it especially since it is a YA book with a Cinderella touch to it. :)

reply

Loved this book! Def. a must read :)

reply

It has been quite some time since I have read a funny, smart, romantic, and thrilling contemporary ya book. It's hard to find all four of those in one binding, but The Boyfriend App delivers!

Audrey is really cool and I'd love to spend a day with her and her friends (they're kinda like my friends, except with the coding and what not).

The story line is a first for me. An app building contest for an overrated phone cooperation (ahem, Apple). So. Freaking. Awesome. Honestly, it's an app that I wouldn't mind giving a shot actually (for Android, please!)

I loved that Audrey is smart as hell and didn't underplay that for anyone. Aidan is so sweet! Lindsey reminded me of the closeness that my cousin and I share. Nigit and Mindy are GREAT supporting characters.

Sise knows how to surprise and I was down for the ride the entire way. I was laughing, shocked, and at one point, crying.

I really don't have a single thing to complain about.

reply

Review:

I received a copy from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review

Katie Sise's The Boyfriend App is a great contemporary young adult debut that explores the intelligent world of technology and how it affects its most recent generation. Through quickly paced prose, geeky romance (of the best kind), and witty dialogue (a definite must!), Sise tells a novel that goes beyond the cute synopses and dives into the importance of truth, friendship, and family.

Audrey, the protagonist, is plagued by her ex-best friend's bullying, the lack of financial funds for college, her secret crush, and the poor financial state her and her mother have lived in since her father's death. But then, one of the most successful technology companies announces a contest: any high school student who creates a successful and popular app will win $200,000.

Whoa.

There are a few things that were hard not to love in Sise's novel: the humor aspect, despite the darker themes; the growing experience Audrey goes through as she discovers that, to quote Voltaire, "with great power, comes great responsibility,"; and how Audrey's world is shaped by the characters surrounding and supporting her.

The characters are so unconventionally nerdy that it makes me love them that much more. They are shy, smart, creative, and I won't lie when it comes to Audrey's love interest, sexy.

The Boyfriend App evolves from a quirky, angst-ridden, and dark story, to one of character growth and, at times, unrealistic situations.

The romance is super sweet, if not a little obvious. I know it's a character trait when a protagonist is oblivious to the affection of those around her, but I still find it a little annoying when the truth is not only obvious, but the characters choose to live in their ignorance. But, putting aside my disdain for naive characters, the romance develops slowly and with a lot of promise.

Sise plays with her readers as she dangles the idea of a romance between Audrey and her love interest within reach, but doesn't completely give them the obvious conclusion right away. She lets the story develop and her characters grow before she gives us what we want for Audrey.

The contrast between Audrey's knowledge of the digital world and that of the real world is interesting. Whereas she is incredibly smart with the former, the novel allows for Audrey to grow and learn more about the latter. I like the comparison of the two worlds as they co-exist because at times, with all of the explanations Sise offers us about HTML Coding and what-not, it helps ground the reader in the here and now--the current state of things for Audrey.

She cannot escape her problems via her computer, so we shouldn't be able to escape either through her vast explanations.

Audrey's relationships with the characters around her are revealing. Her relationship with her cousin is touching, while her feelings for her love interest reveal how powerful and important friendship is to her. Her relationship with her mother is at times strained, but she is a teenager recovering from her father's death, so her tendency to shut her mother out is understandable, making her relatable.

What I didn't like about the novel was how unrealistic it was. Okay, a boyfriend app is a possibility, but as the original app evolves with a little extra oomph, Sise pushes the boundaries between reality and science fiction. Who knows? Perhaps in the future we will see apps that can control everything about you, emotionally, but for now it is a little hard to swallow. Especially in a contemporary young adult novel.

Also, and this is just a little comment on the continuity of the novel, there is a scene where the characters are scrolling and searching for a particular name in a list. My question is, if these characters are computer brainiacs, why couldn't they just hit: CTRL+F?

I know, I know. It's a little thing, but for some reason it really bugged me. I know computer geniuses and they never navigate computers the "normal" way--instead, they always have a CTRL+this or a CTRL+that shortcut.

Despite the aforementioned flaws, Sise's novel has a lot of raw emotion. Audrey is still recuperating from her dad's accidental death and the loss of her best friend. The Boyfriend App has a catchy title, but the themes within the novel are much darker than the title suggests.

A few of these themes are: Bullying, to the point of physical abuse, occasionally takes place; the addicting qualities behind technology in today's society; and depression is shown by Audrey's addiction to her computer, since it was the greatest shared interested she once held with her father.

The Boyfriend App is a young adult novel that readers of contemporary fiction will enjoy, even with the little touches of technology here and there, since they add character to the novel. I recommend this to readers who want a quick book to read that has a protagonist who starts off as weak, but comes out at the end as a powerful force.

reply

Related Blog Posts

Thanks for signing up!

Check your email and follow the instructions to complete your registration!

If the email gets lost, go ahead and request it again!